Mark Mallett – Countdown to the Kingdom

Countdown to the Kingdom

Posted on by Mark. All image and text credit: Mark Mallett

IT’S here! A brand new resource for you to find Heaven’s Messages in these turbulent times: CountdowntotheKingdom.com

With the help of my daughter Tianna William’s incredible artistic and web design skills, I have teamed up with theologian Peter Bannister and authors Prof. Daniel O’Connor (The Crown of Sanctity) and Christine Watkins (The Warning) to provide a website where you can find credible, sound, and approved private revelation. It’s a collection of relevant and recent prophetic messages as well as theological teachings on the “end times” and videos from the contributors. I’m especially excited about the “Timeline” we created that carefully follows the vision of the Early Church Fathers, Popes, and Our Lord and Lady’s messages. Scroll to the bottom CountdowntotheKingdom.com. For those who are new and have questions about prophecy or are reticent to go near private revelation, I refer you to these urgent writings on the subject:

Can You Ignore Private Revelation?
Turn on the Headlights
Why the World Remains in Pain
Prophecy Properly Understood

In truth, when the idea for this was conceived before Christmas 2019, we never imagined that we would be launching this website at this time in current events. We believe it is no coincidence, and in fact, that it is a grace for all of us seeking Heaven’s direction at this hour.

I recorded a welcome video for you on my computer, but at the very same time the new website went live, my computer utterly cratered. No surprise there. So, I grabbed my cellphone and made this quick video for all of my dear readers here at The Now Word. As for me, I will continue to write you with a renewed sense of urgency while making contributions to CountdowntotheKingdom.com.

Read the full post and see Mark’s video HERE

Read This Article Today…

This is an article by Daniel O’Connor from his website. All image and text credit: Daniel O’Connor.

This is Only the Beginning of the Birth Pangs. Are We Listening Now?

“I was alive during World War II, and it wasn’t this bad even back then.”

This I overheard one man say to another last week as I was out and about my daily endeavors — back when things were nowhere near as bad as they are today as I write this post … under government mandated lockdown in New York and deprived of what has been the anchor of my daily life for the last 12 years — Mass and Holy Communion.

But I do not write this post to reiterate sentiments akin to the one above: almost every article generated every day in the mainstream media is doing precisely that:

Apocalyptic.” “The Sky is Falling.” “This is not a recession: it’s an ice age.” “This is without precedent.” “Life will never be the same again.“The world will never be the same again.”

These are the types of headlines one is constantly seeing even in the very mainstream media outlets that are regarded for their cool-headedness. And I will not dispute the validity of these headlines.

But there is one headline I recently saw, which I do indeed want to dispute:

This is the thing that this generation will remember.”

No, it is not.

Surely, this is a thing that will be remembered, but not the thing; not by a long shot. Though indeed tragic and unprecedented, the present trial is — in terms of temporal disarray — a mere inconvenience compared to what is coming soon. (I give an important qualification on this point later in this post)

It is with absolutely no flippancy or glibness that I chose the title for this article: my wife will be delivering our fourth child any day now, and I know full well that the first birth pang, while it will be quite painful for her, will be only a preview of what is to come thereafter. 

But it is also with no sense of  “doom and gloom” or “fear mongering” that I chose the title for this article, either: despite all the pain of labor and delivery, it is itself nothing compared to the glory and the beauty of what follows: a new life emerging visibly into the world.

This, of course, is why Our Lord chose precisely this analogy in prophetically describing the days that, it seems, we have now officially embarked upon:

“All these things are merely the beginning of the birth pangs” – Matthew 24:8

Yes, unprecedented Chastisements are about to inundate the world. But so is a glorious Era of Peace beyond anything the world has ever seen — wherein God’s Kingdom will arrive more fully than ever before, and His Will shall be done on earth as it is done in Heaven. 

But I have been proclaiming this message for a long time; so why this post now? 

Because it is now long overdue for the scoffers to cease and desist their scoffing, and get on their knees and beg God’s forgiveness for opposing Heaven’s messages for so long, now that the truth of these messages is stunningly displayed for all the world to see. (And most of the “scoffers,” by the way, are not the worldly; the worldly generally know nothing of these prophecies — a sorry state of affairs I largely dedicate myself to trying to change. The scoffers, rather, are usually “orthodox Catholic” lay people who have appointed themselves the judges of private revelation or who flippantly denounce it merely because it is not a constituent of the Deposit of Faith or because it does not align with their own personal eschatological speculations)

  • In recent years, trustworthy private revelation has been saying that, very soon, the Eucharist would be very difficult to find. The scoffers scoffed. Now it is a reality — more so than ever before in the entire history of the Church, as far as I can tell (Yes, there were Mass cancellations during the 1918 pandemic as well, and other pandemics, but it seems that those cancellations were nowhere near as universal as what we are now experiencing; in better days, our shepherds did not compete to see who could cancel public Masses more quickly in the face of danger). 
  • In recent years, trustworthy private revelation has been saying that a new disease would inundate the world. The scoffers scoffed. Now it is a reality.
  • In 2019, Fr. Michel Rodrigue announced that he was told that, come February 2020, he was not to travel outside the country any longer. The scoffers scoffed. This admonition could not have been more prophetic.
  • In 2019, Fr. Michel begged Catholics to make sure they got to Confession before 2020. The scoffers scoffed. Now they can’t get to confession at all.
  • In 2019, Fr. Michel said to have several months of food and supplies on hand. The scoffers scoffed. Now they must wish they listened.
  • In recent years, trustworthy private revelation has been foretelling an imminent financial collapse (to be followed by economic collapse, then total societal collapse). The scoffers scoffed. Now the market has plunged more drastically than ever before in American history, already eclipsing the Great Depression itself. And the collapse seems to still only be in its initial stages.

[For now, I am going to spare you a long list of the details of and quotes from these fulfilled prophecies; I am contributing towards a website that will be public on the Feast of the Annunciation, www.CountDownToTheKingdom.com, that will have much of this]

This isn’t an “I told you so” blog post. I am the last one worthy of saying that, for God knows how many things I should be doing which I am not doing, and what I plead for is His Mercy on my soul, not the vindication of myself before others.

No, rather, this is an “I beg you to now begin listening before it truly is too late” post

Read the rest of Daniel’s article HERE.

Clash of the Kingdoms – Mark Mallet

Posted on by Mark. Image and text credits Mark Mallet – the Now Word

JUST as one will be blinded by flying debris if he tries to stare into the furious winds of a hurricane, so too, one can be blinded by all the evil, fear and terror unfolding hour by hour right now. This is what Satan wants—to drag the world into despair and doubt, into panic and self-preservation in order to lead us to a “saviour.” What is unfolding right now is not another speed bump in world history. It is the final clash of two kingdoms, the final confrontation of this era between the Kingdom of Christ versus the kingdom of Satan…

We are now standing in the face of the greatest historical confrontation humanity has ever experienced. We are now facing the final confrontation between the Church and the anti-church, between the Gospel and the anti-gospel, between Christ and the antichrist. —Eucharistic Congress for the bicentennial celebration of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Philadelphia, PA, 1976; cf. Catholic Online (confirmed by Deacon Keith Fournier who was in attendance)

This writing is perhaps the most sobering thing I’ve ever written in a long while. Please, do not count the words, but count the grace it is that we still have time to sit together in Our Lady’s school. Let’s cover this writing and our minds with God’s protection as we pray three times:

Most Precious Blood of Jesus Christ… save us and the whole world.

Read the rest of Mark’s post by clicking HERE.

A Future Pope on Fasting from the Eucharist

Re-blogging an article from Parishable Items blog by Fr. Victor Feltes. Image and post credit: Fr. Victor Feltes.

personal reflection: I thought of this deprivation as something that might make us all really think about what it is we are missing in these days… if one sees these days of not having to go to Mass or not having to go to Communion as kind of a “relief” or something, perhaps it will awaken something in us that asks “why do we feel like that?” For those who know what it is we are missing and feel it deeply, it is another awakening too… you often don’t really realize what it is that you have until it is taken away… this could have a really deeply rooted effect on many of us…

JM

A Future Pope on Fasting from the Eucharist

In the Latin Rite of the Catholic Church (of which 98.6% of the world’s Catholics are members) there is only one day each year when no Masses are to be celebrated – that is, Good Friday. That day’s liturgy contains a Communion service in which presanctified (previously consecrated) Hosts are received and eaten by the faithful. However, in the early Church, there was no consumption of Holy Communion on Good Fridays by the faithful at all. This tradition was noted by the esteemed theologian Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (the future Pope Benedict XVI) in his 2002 book “Pilgrim Fellowship of Faith: The Church as Communion.”

In passages relevant to our present-day, Lenten reality, Cardinal Ratzinger reflects upon the spiritual value that could be found in the practice of Catholics in full communion with the Church abstaining for a time from consuming Jesus Christ in the Holy Eucharist:

“When Augustine felt his death approaching, he ‘excommunicated’ himself and took upon himself ecclesiastical penitence. In his last days, he set himself alongside, in solidarity, with the public sinners who seek forgiveness and grace through the pain of not receiving the Communion. He wanted to meet his Lord in humility of those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for Him, the righteous and gracious One. Against the background of his sermons and writings, which describe the mystery of the Church as a communion with the Body of Christ and as the Body of Christ, on the basis of the Eucharist, in a really marvelous way, this gesture is quite shocking. It seems to me more profound and fitting, the more often I ponder it. Do we not often take things too lightly today when we receive the most Holy Sacrament? Could such a spiritual fasting not sometimes be useful, or even necessary, to renew and establish more deeply our relation to the Body of Christ?

In the early Church there was a most expressive exercise of this kind: probably since the time of the apostles, Eucharistic fasting on Good Friday was part of the Church’s spirituality of Communion. Not receiving Communion on one of the most holy days of the Church’s year, which was celebrated with no Mass and without any Communion of the faithful, was a particularly profound way of sharing in the Passion of the Lord: the sorrowing of the bride from whom the bridegroom has been taken away (see Mark 2:20). I think that a Eucharistic fast of this kind, if it were deliberate and experienced as a deprivation, could even today be properly significant, on certain occasions that would have to be carefully considered—such as days of penitence (and why not, for instance, on Good Friday once more?), or also perhaps especially at great public Masses when there are so many people that a dignified distribution of the Sacrament is often not possible, so that by not receiving the Sacrament people could truly show more reverence and love than by doing so in a way that contradicts the sublime nature of this event.

Spiritual hunger, like bodily hunger, can be a vehicle of love.

Such fasting—which could not be allowed to become arbitrary, of course, but would have to be consonant with the spiritual guidance of the Church—could help people toward a deepening of their personal relation to the Lord in the Sacrament; it could be an act of solidarity with all those who have a yearning for the Sacrament but cannot receive it. It seems to me that the problem of people who have been divorced and remarried, yet equally the problem of intercommunion (in mixed marriages, for example), would be less of a burden if voluntary spiritual fasting was at the same time undertaken in visible recognition and expression of the fact that we are all dependent upon that ‘healing of love’ which the Lord effected in the ultimate solitude of the Cross. I would not of course wish to suggest by this a return to some kind of Jansenism: in biological life, as in spiritual life, fasting presumes that eating is the normal thing to do. Yet from time to time we need a cure for falling into mere habit and its dullness. Sometimes we need to be hungry—need bodily and spiritual hunger—so as once more to comprehend the Lord’s gifts and to understand the suffering of our brethren who are hungry. Spiritual hunger, like bodily hunger, can be a vehicle of love.”

From the Book of Heaven

Notes to consider in these challenging days… from Luisa Piccarreta’s Book of Heaven, Volume 12.

2/12/18 – Vol. 12

Deserted churches, and without ministers.

Continuing in my usual state, my always lovable Jesus made Himself seen so very afflicted, and I said to Him: ‘My Love, why are You so afflicted?’ And He: “Ah! my daughter (Luisa), when I allow that churches remain deserted, ministers dispersed, Masses reduced, it means that the Sacrifices are offenses for Me, that the prayers are insults, the adorations irreverences, the confessions amusements, and without Fruit. Therefore, no longer finding My Glory, but offenses, nor any Good for them – making no use of them, I take them away. But this tearing ministers away from the Sanctuary means also that things have reached the ugliest point, and that the variety of scourges will multiply. How hard man is – how hard!”


VOL. 12 – January 31, 1918

Dissolving oneself in Jesus, to be able to say: what belongs to Jesus is mine.

I was abandoning all of myself in Jesus, when He told me: “My daughter, dissolve yourself in Me. Dissolve your prayer in Mine, so that your prayer and Mine may be one single prayer, and one would not recognize which one is yours and which Mine. Your pains, your works, your will, your love – dissolve them all in my pains, in my works, etc., so that they may mix one with the other, and form one single thing; to the extent that you may be able to say, ‘What belongs to Jesus is mine’, and I may say, ‘What is yours is Mine.’

Imagine a glass of water, which is poured into a big container of water. Would you be able to distinguish, afterwards, the water of the glass from the water of the container? Certainly not. Therefore, for your greatest gain and my highest contentment, repeat often in whatever you do: ‘Jesus, I pour this into You, so that I may do not my will, but Yours’, and immediately I will pour my acting into you.”

Daniel O’Connor: No Time for Retreat…

The following article information is from Daniel O’Connor’s recent blog post which can be found here at Daniel O’Connor’s Website. All photo and text credits: Daniel O’Connor.

This is No Time for Retreat: Dare not Underestimate the Power of Your Witness

the power of your witness only grows ever stronger with each passing moment that brings us closer to the long-prophesied Great Events, and each new day presents an ever more urgent call to boldly proclaim the Faith. I am genuinely convinced of this, and I implore you to test out my thesis yourself. You will find it vindicated.

I’d like to share just a few experiences I’ve recently had with God’s utterly gratuitous outpouring of grace through my own meager efforts — efforts that all the faithful are easily capable of — in hopes of inspiring you to do likewise.

Daniel O’Connor

Please click HERE to read Daniel’s full blog post

Preparing the Way…

Another Relevant Article by Mark Mallet…. from his website here on November 11, 2019.

image credit Mark Mallett

A voice cries out:
In the desert prepare the way of the LORD!
Make straight in the wasteland a highway for our God!
(Yesterday’s First Reading)

YOU have given your fiat to God. You have given your “yes” to Our Lady. But many of you are no doubt asking, “Now what?” And that’s okay. It’s the same question Matthew asked when he left his collection tables; it is the same question Andrew and Simon wondered as they left their fishing nets; it’s the same question Saul (Paul) pondered as he sat there stunned and blinded by the sudden revelation that Jesus was calling him, a murderer, to be His witness to the Gospel. Jesus eventually answered those questions, as He will yours.

GOD’S GENEROSITY

If you are only giving your “yes” to God right now, then you are akin to those in Christ’s parable of the workers who entered the vineyard at the last hour of the day, but were paid the same wage as those who had laboured all day. That is, Jesus will give you the same Gift as those who have been preparing for it for decades, which of course, may not seem fair. But, says the vineyard Owner:

Am I not free to do as I wish with my own money? Are you envious because I am generous? (Matthew 20:15)

God’s ways are not our ways — “his knowledge is beyond scrutiny,” says today’s First Mass reading. And He has His reasons. Even though St. Paul was not among the Twelve who gave up everything and followed Jesus for three years, he became one of the greatest Apostles. Why? Because the one who is shown the greatest mercy is often the one who “has shown great love” in return.[1] Click here to continue reading Mark Mallett’s post